How do you feel about people getting abortions because they find out the baby will be born with downs syndrome or another disability that is not life threatening? I have never looked into it, and just heard somebody refer to this as eugenics. They call it a “reproductive rights issue.” If people have freedom to choose abortions for their own, personal, private reasons, is it fair to judge somebody who wants a baby for not wanting a baby with disabilities? Who’s reproductive rights issue is it?

greeneyedzengirl:

wishuponawish:

prochoice-or-gtfo:

I will always support a pregnant person’s right to choose what they want to do with their bodies. When it comes to fetuses that would be born with disabilities, I can understand why a parent would want an abortion. Many people know they cannot handle a child with a disability. As sad as it is, it’s not the fault of the pregnant person for knowing their own limits. It’s society’s fault for not making accommodations for people with disabilities. We live in an inherently ableist society where it is much harder to live if you’re disabled vs. able bodied. If you want to end abortions due to disabilities, make society more accessible to people with them.

-Kyoung

Like Kyoung said, our society is intrinsically ableist and makes all of us ableist along with it to varying degrees. When people consider abortion because they want a “perfect” child, that’s a place where more education about the humanity and value of all people is absolutely necessary. When someone considers an abortion because they can’t financially afford a disabled child, that’s something we need to examine society for. Yes, all children are expensive, but some disabilities can be unaffordable for people in certain income brackets. There’s also the emotional toll it can take that some people know they won’t be able to handle.

Every year, so many disabled people are turned over to the care of the government because their families cannot care for them properly for a variety of reasons. Some people are left at homeless shelters because they’ll get better care there. A young man I used to work with directly was turned over to the care of the government when he turned 18 because the benefits his family received from the government to assist with his care stopped, and his family simply couldn’t afford to pay for the treatment and living situation that he needed to be safe. He was safer away from them, and they had to give up their son to do that. I used to work with disabled clients living in group homes who you could see the signs of abuse on. Not everyone is emotionally capable of subjecting a child to a life like that.

It’s easy to just point the finger and scream ableism, and yes, ableism is a huge factor in why many disabled fetuses are aborted, but it’s not so black and white as being the pregnant person’s “fault.”
-V

Okay, so I understand no one can know the future and be sure that they’ll be financially secure enough for a kid for two decades, but “Yes, all children are expensive, but some disabilities can be unaffordable for people in certain income brackets.”
Yeah, and some of those disabilities will happen later in life to a kid that was perfectly healthy, and people should be aware of that possibility.

I’m personally of the opinion that if you’re not prepared to raise a disabled kid, you’re not prepared to raise a kid full stop.

As an autistic who fought every day of my life to get here, I rightfully fear eugenics. It’s a known fact that once the test became available for downs, the abortion rate for downs children shot up to 95% They want to do the same thing for autism. I fully support a woman’s right to choose. But don’t think abortions because of disabilities are a good plan. That’s eugenics, that’s ableist erasure of disabled lives.

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