bunniesravenclawsupernatural:

perfectlycrazydragon:

bunniesravenclawsupernatural:

myautisticass:

cortezily:

perfectlycrazydragon:

differentblogtitle:

cortezily:

So this morning one of my student said “I love you” back. I have been trying to get him to say that for about a year and a half! I am so proud of my little baby, he has grown so much.

ugh

cortezily:   Your student can tell you if, say, his stomach hurts or whatever, right?

perfectlycrazydragon No. He cannot. He can’t tell me if he’s sick. He can’t tell me if he’s upset. He is for the most part nonverbal. Which is why I was so proud that he was able to respond.

@cortezily 

I want you to imagine you were going to be airdropped onto an alien planet in a month. These aliens have a language which consists of a trumpeting noise that is difficult for a human larynx to produce. 

You will have no one with you. What would be your priorities be in learning the language? 

It wouldn’t be “I love you.”

“BUT HE HAS LONGER THAN A MONTH” I hear you cry. 

Maybe he does, maybe he will die of appendicitis next week. This is a hypothetical situation but I am certain he will have a headache before February is pretty high. 

How will he tell someone? All he can say is “I love you.” Now he has to attempt to add a headache to everything else he has to manage. 

No one here is saying you should be able to make this child communicate instantaneously. BUT they ARE saying that choosing the phrase “I love you” as a priority reveals who benefits most from the education you provide. 

If this kid is nonverbal than he has ways to communicate affection. Which means he already has his own way to say “I love you.” But he doesn’t have a way to say “I’m sick” or “What you are doing hurts” or report if someone has been abusing him. 

“I love you” is a nice thing for others to hear but it won’t make this kid safer. If anything it has made life harder for him, because now he will have to perform this trick anytime someone says “I love you” to him. Think about that gross aunt your parents made you hug and kiss. Think about having family members insist you do something they found impressive. That happens to disabled kids too. 

I understand it hurts to be told you are messing up when you are only trying to help. 

But at the end of the day, if this is really about him, you should set aside your own feelings and consider if these people (most of whom are autistic) might have a better way to keep “your little baby” safe. 

If you can’t do that, I have to wonder if it was ever really about him. 

Is this about teaching autistic people to talk?

How many other sentences can he say yet? Have you covered all important things? Did he ask to be taught this sentence?

Why are y’all all alls assuming stuff? If there since hidden info?

@bunniesravenclawsupernatural:

Simple.  We’re not.

Girofinsaneness brought up some discussion that meant things required clarification and further information.  Generally, one goes about requesting clarification by asking questions.

Girlofinsaneness
 
said she hadn’t covered important things. The reactions went from there.

oh no -.- then where’s the point?? ugh.

@bunniesravenclawsupernatural:

I’ve copy-pasted and bolded the major  points for you but the points are all literally  in @myautisticass‘s response – you know the one right above where you chimed in? 


No one here is saying you should be able to make this child communicate instantaneously. BUT they ARE saying that choosing the phrase “I love you” as a priority reveals who benefits most from the education you provide.

“I love you” is a nice thing for others to hear but it won’t make this kid safer. If anything it has made life harder for him, because now he will have to perform this trick anytime someone says “I love you” to him. Think about that gross aunt your parents made you hug and kiss. Think about having family members insist you do something they found impressive. That happens to disabled kids too.

But at the end of the day, if this is really about him, you should set aside your own feelings and consider if these people (most of whom are autistic) might have a better way to keep “your little baby” safe. If you can’t do that, I have to wonder if it was ever really about him.

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