Kevin Folta | GMO Answers

is of flavors, and studies at photomorphogenesis and flowering. He has also written many publications and edited books, most recently was the 2011 Genetics, Genomics, and Breeding of Berries. Dr. Folta received the NSF CAREER Award, an HHMI Mentoring Award and was recognized as “University of Florida Foundation Research Professor” in 2010. From This ExpertRecently Answered Questions Studies & ArticlesQ: which diseases are GMO crops resistant toPosted On: Tuesday, 11/22/2016 6:36 pmAnswered By: Kevin Folta, Professor and Chairman, Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida, Tuesday, 12/27/2016 1:35 pmA: This question is an important one but requires a nuanced answer. If we are talking about commercial crops, there are only two examples currently grown—some squash and Hawaiian papaya. These plants have been engineered to be resistant to viruses that cause diseases that greatly affect production.   The papaya is probably the best example. Papaya ringspot virus was devastating the crop in Hawaii. The virus is spread by insects, so controlling the virus meant insecticides and then…Continue ReadingSafety, Health, and Nutrition 0 comments ShareQ: Why is the spliced genes action on the dna stranded differnt from other genes that are normally therePosted On: Thursday, 4/21/2016 4:05 pmAnswered By: Kevin Folta, Professor and Chairman, Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida, Wednesday, 5/11/2016 1:39 amA: I think this question is asking about how a gene that is inserted is different from the resident genes within the organism. It is an important question, but the answer is complex, so I’ll provide a starting point. I’m glad to go deeper for you if you’d like, so contact me directly or I can continue answering here on GMOAnswers.com.   First, a quick lesson in how genes work. When we think of a “gene,” this is the information that leads to a trait,…

Source: Kevin Folta | GMO Answers

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